kerbtier.de
Beetle fauna of Germany © 2007–2021 Christoph Benisch
DE | EN | Contact | Imprint | Privacy Policy | RSS
Banner kerbtier.de kTitelgrafik
 

Featured species

Text © K. Reißmann, T. Hörren, M. Stern, F. Bötzl and C. Benisch

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9


15.10.2021
Callidium aeneum (DeGeer, 1775)
Callidium aeneum
 A
 B
 C
7 
The 9 to 15 mm large longhorn beetle Callidium aeneum (family Cerambycidae) is one of three species of the genus known to occur in Germany. Worldwide 21 Callidium species haven been described, the majority of them in the Nearctic. The silvicolous species lives in the montane and subalpine zone from North and Central Europe over Asia Minor and the Caucasus to Siberia. The development cycle takes one year in spruce, occasionally pine, fir or larch. The larvae need sufficient level of humidity to develop. Larvae present in processed timber wood can often finalize their development. Since pupation takes place in a sealed cell deeply embedded in the wood, Callidium aeneum can cause technical damage. In Germany the species is known from virtually all regions, but scattered and not common to rare. (CB)

08.10.2021
Pissodes piceae (Ill., 1807)
Pissodes piceae
 A
 B
 C
13 
The 7 to 10 mm large European silver fir weevil Pissodes piceae (family Curculionidae) is one of seven species of the holarctic genus present in Germany. The stenotopic, silvicolous species lives in the mountain range of Central and South Europe to the Caucasus. Pissodes piceae prefers montane coniferous forests as habitat and develops on silver fir and other cultivated fir species. Oviposition takes place starting June in egg chambers dug into the bark. The larvae feed on the vascular cambium and pupate in the following spring. Mostly older trees are attacked, around 40 to 80 years old, preferably ailing or weak growing. A real economic relevance for forestry is doubtful. In Germany, recent records are known from the southern half and Westphalia. Pissodes piceae is not regarded as endangered. (CB)

01.10.2021
Melasis buprestoides (L., 1761)
Melasis buprestoides
 A
 B
 C
13 
The 6 to 9 mm large false click beetle Melasis buprestoides (family Eucnemidae) is the only representative of the genus in Germany. Worldwide 14 species have been described, thereof two from Europe and three from the Nearctic. M. buprestoides is of westpalearctic distribution from North Africa over Europe to Asia minor, the Caucasus and Siberia. The beetles live forests, parks and gardens, preferably on sun-exposed trees. The adult beetles can be found throughout the year in the brood substrate. They swarm during May and June. The larvae develop in a 2-3-year cycle in the stems and thick branches of beech, occasionally hornbeam and elm. They pupate in late summer. The beetle hatches and hibernates in a sealed cell. M. buprestoides is recorded from all Federal States and is not endangered. (CB)

24.09.2021
Anthocomus coccineus (Schall., 1783)
Anthocomus coccineus
 A
 B
 C
12 
The 4.3 to 5 mm large soft-winged flower beetle Anthocomus coccineus (family Malachiidae) is one of three representatives of the genus in Germany. It is known to occur in Europe, from Spain and Portugal in the West over the British Isles to Poland and Hungary in the East. A. coccineus is diurnal and lives in wetlands, where it feeds on pollen of reed (Phragmites). Like other representatives of Malachiidae the beetles show a special courtship behavior preceding mating: During courtship, the female bites repeatedly chitinous structures at the tip of the elytra of the male, which are associated with complex glands, the so called exciter organ. Thereby, both sexes are getting in mating mood. The larvae develop in decaying wood, where they prey on other insect larvae. (CB)

17.09.2021
Dianous coerulescens (Gyll., 1810)
Dianous coerulescens
 A
 B
 C
20 
The 5 to 6 mm large rove beetle Dianous coerulescens (family Staphylinidae) is the only representative of the holarctic and oriental genus in our fauna. Dianous coerulescens is known to occur in North and Central Europe, from the British Isles and Fennoscandia to Italy and the Balkan. The beetles live in the low mountain range and its foreland. They dwell in moss and vegetation at waterfalls, weirs and cold torrents. Representatives of the genera Dianous and stenus show a remarkable skimming behavior: With the hydrophobic lower side of their tarsi the beetles are able to walk on water. While touching the water surface with the tip of their abdomen, they secrete a water-insoluble secretion, which rapidly spreads as a film on the water surface, propelling the beetle at its edge. By bending their abdomen, the beetles are able to actively steer and reach speeds of up to 40 cm/s. (CB)

10.09.2021
Cephennium gallicum Ganglb., 1899
Cephennium gallicum
 A
 B
 C
6 
The only 1.2 to 1.3 mm large antlike stone beetle Cephennium gallicum (family Scydmaenidae) is one of four representatives of the genus in Germany. Worldwide more than 100 Cephennium species have been described, mostly from the Palearctic. The eurytopic, hygrophilous and silvicolous Cephennium gallicum occurs in North and Central Europe and has been introduced to North America (Nova Scotia, Canada). It prefers floodplain and other wet forests, alder cars, swamps and bogs as habitat. The tiny beetles can be found in moss, under rotten leaf litter and brushwood as well as in the humus layer at foots of trees. They are specialized predators of moss mites (Oribatida). With their mandibles they are able to cut the hard exoskeleton on the mites open. In Germany, the species is missing in the North and the East, but is not endangered. (CB)

03.09.2021
Lilioceris merdigera (L., 1758)
Lilioceris merdigera
 A
 B
 C
10 
The 6 to 8 mm large leaf beetle Lilioceris merdigera (family Chrysomelidae) is one of three species of the genus currently occurring in Germany. It can be distinguished from the similar sister species Lilioceris lilii by the red head and legs. The species is of palearctic distribution. It can be found from May to September in forests, gardens and parks. Both beetles and larvae feed on the leaves of plants from the lily and leek family, e.g. Lily of the Valley, Turk's cap lily as well as ramsons, onion and garlic. In cultures of the latter it can become a pest. When disturbed, the beetles can produce chirping sounds by means of an abdominal stridulatory apparatus. The larvae cover themselves with a protective case of their own excrements. In Germany, Liliceris merdigera is everywhere present and is not endangered. (CB)

27.08.2021
Oiceoptoma thoracica (L., 1758)
Oiceoptoma thoracica
 A
 B
 C
12 
The 12 to 16 mm large red-breasted carrion beetle Oiceoptoma thoracica (family Silphidae) is the only representative of the otherwise holarctic genus Oiceoptoma in Germany. Worldwide 3 species have been described from North America and 6 from the Palearctic. Oiceoptoma thoracica in known to occur from Europe (including the British Isles) to Japan and reaches the Polar Circle in the North. With its flattened oval body shape, the red velvety pronotum and the black elytra, the species can't be confused with any other species in our fauna. The can be found in forests, gardens and on meadows. Both beetles and larvae feed on carrion, dung and decaying plant matter fungi (especially common stinkhorn, which spores the help to disseminate). In Germany the species is recorded from all Federal States and very common. (CB)

20.08.2021
Polyphylla fullo (L., 1758)
Polyphylla fullo
 A
 B
 C
19 
The 25 to 36 mm large Pine Chafer Polyphylla fullo (family Scarabaeidae) is the only species of the genus in Europe and the largest representative of subfamily Melolonthinae. It is known to occur in North Africa and Europe, in North to South Sweden, in the East to the Caucasus. The male exhibits a conspicuous enlarged antennal “fan”. The larval development in the soil on the roots of grasses and sedges takes 3 to 4 years. The adult beetles live in sandy habitats, e.g. sunny pine forests and dunes. They feed on pine foliage but do not cause economically relevant damage. In June and July the beetles swarm at dusk. With the exception of the Northeast, recent records are known from most Federal States. Polyphyllo fullo is regarded as endangered (RL 2) and is protected by the Federal Regulation for the Protection of Species (BArtSchV). (CB)

13.08.2021
Dermestes haemorrhoidalis Küst., 1852
Dermestes haemorrhoidalis
 A
 B
 C
13 
The 6.5 to 9 mm large black larder beetle Dermestes haemorrhoidalis (family Dermestidae) is one of 13 permanently occurring species of the genus in Germany. The synanthropic species is of virtually cosmopolitan distribution. It lives in storages and households where both beetles and larvae feed on foodstuffs of any kind, e.g. meat products, cheese, noodles or dried fish. They are able to digest keratin too, hence they can become pests on furs, feathers, wool, leather and in insect collections. For pupation, the larvae burrow into materials not too hard. In this way, Dermestes haemorrhoidalis is regarded both as a hygiene pest and a material pest. The species is recorded from numerous Federal States and records have become increasingly common in households in cities. It is not regarded as endangered. (CB)

06.08.2021
Chlorophanus viridis (L., 1758)
Chlorophanus viridis
 A
 B
 C
20 
The 8 to 11 mm large weevil Chlorophanus viridis (family Curculionidae) is the most common of the three species of the genus in Germany and can be easily recognized by the conspicuous, fluorescent yellow stripes at the sides of the elytra. It is known to occur in Europe with the exception of the British Isles and Scandinavia. The polyphagous beetles live on various deciduous trees, among others on willow, poplar, alder and hazel. They can be found in fresh to wet deciduous forests, mostly near creeks and in river meadows. The ectophagous larvae develop in the soil and feed on the roots of the host trees. The adult larvae hibernate and pupate in spring. The beetles hatch in May. In Germany, the species is not endangered, but has become rarer over the recent years for unknown reasons. (CB)

30.07.2021
Spercheus emarginatus (Schall., 1783)
Spercheus emarginatus
 A
 B
 C
9 
The 5.5 to 7 mm large filter-feeding water scavenger beetle Spercheus emarginatus (family Spercheidae) is the only species in the genus in Germany. Worldwide the family contains only one genus comprising 18 species, most of them in the afrotropic and oriental region. Spercheus emarginatus ranges from Europe over Asia Minor to Kazakhstan and was recently also recorded from China. In our fauna the stenotopic, limicolous species lives in stagnant water with rich vegetation, often in the mud on the edge of small, eutrophic ponds. Both adults and larvae are among the few coleopteran filter-feeders, feeding on detritus or possibly small crustaceans and insect larvae. In Germany, Spercheus emarginatus is known from virtually all Federal States and is regarded as not endangered. (CB)

23.07.2021
Oreodytes sanmarkii (Sahlb., 1826)
Oreodytes sanmarkii
 A
 B
 C
11 
The 2.5 to 3 mm large diving beetle Oreodytes sanmarkii (family Dytiscidae) belongs to the small genus Oreodytes comprising only three species in Germany. Worldwide around 30 species have been described, thereof 18 in North America. Most species of the genus are distinctively patterned with various marks and stripes. Oreodytes sanmarkii is a boreomontane species occurring in Scandinavia and in the mountain range in central and south Germany, separated by a broad zone of extinction in the North German Plain. The species has been also recorded from North America. In our fauna the stenotopic, rheophilous beetle can be found in quiet zones of cold mountain torrents and in fountain moss. It reacts more sensitive towards pollution and siltation than most other dytiscids. In Germany it is not regarded as endangered. (CB)

16.07.2021
Agonum marginatum (L., 1758)
Agonum marginatum
 A
 B
 C
19 
The 8.5 to 10.5 mm large ground beetle Agonum marginatum (family Carabidae) can be easily recognized by its greenish cupreous shine and the conspicuous yellow sides of the elytra among the representatives of the speciose genus Agonum, which is known to occur in the holarctic, neotropic and paleotropic region. As a western palearctic species of the meridional and temperate zone, Agonum marginatum ranges from North Africa including the Azores over Europe (without the far North) to Central Asia. The halotolerant pioneer species can be found at the edges of river, ponds and lakes, especially on bare ground with clayish and muddy substrate. In Germany, the species is recorded from all Federal States and is everywhere common except in the mountain range. It is regarded as not endangered. (CB)

09.07.2021
Apoderus coryli (L., 1758)
Apoderus coryli
 A
 B
 C
29 
The 6 to 8 mm large hazel-leaf roller weevil Apoderus coryli (family Attelabidae) is the more common of the two species of the genus in Europe. The species is of east-palearctic distribution and ranges from Europe to the Near East. The beetle can be found from May to September on its host plant, the hazel (Corylus) in sparse deciduous forests and at the edges of forests. Based on size and thickness, the female selects a suitable hazel leaf and forms a cylinder or cradle during a few hours, which is used to deposit a single egg. The larva develops inside the cylinder, feeding on the leaf matter and finally pupates in the cylinder. Depending on the climate, there one or two generations per year. In Germany, Apoderus coryli is known to occur in virtually all Federal States and is regarded as not endangered. (CB)

02.07.2021
Ochina ptinoides (Marsh., 1802)
Ochina ptinoides
 A
 B
 C
20 
The 2.5 to 3.8 mm large Ivy boring beetle Ochina ptinoides (family Anobiidae) is the more common representative of the two species of the genus in Germany. In Europe, the genus comprises five species in total. Ochina ptinoides is known to occur from North Africa over Spain and Central Europe (including the British Isles) to Greece and Russia. The stenotopic, thermophilous species can be found in parks, gardens, vineyards and at the edges of forests on ivy (Hedera helix). The larvae develop in dry or semi-dry old ivy branches of a few centimeters of diameter. The beetles are diurnal and swarm in the evening hours. They are attracted to light. Whereas not rare in regions with favorable warm climate, the species becomes rarer towards the East and is regarded as vulnerable (RL 3) in Germany. (CB)

25.06.2021
Hoshihananomia perlata (Sulz., 1776)
Hoshihananomia perlata
 A
 B
 C
22 
In Germany, the 6.8 to 10 mm large tumbling flower beetle Hoshihananomia perlata (family Mordellidae) is the only representative of the genus, which comprises three species in Europe and more than 100 species in the tropic region, where it is quite speciose. Its distribution is discontinuous and ranges from South France to North Japan without Northern and Southeast Europe. The thermophilic beetle belongs to the Urwald relic species. The adult beetles can be found on blossoming herbs and shrubs as well as on dead wood. The larvae develop in dead wood of deciduous trees, mainly oak, beech and birch. In the sunshine, the beetles escape very swiftly when only slightly disturbed. In Germany, the species is regarded as endangered (RL 2). However, it has increased its range over the recent years. (CB)

18.06.2021
Aphodius obliteratus Panz., 1823
Aphodius obliteratus
 A
 B
 C
17 
The 4.5 to 7 mm large dung beetle Aphodius obliteratus (family Scarabaeidae) belongs to the speciose tribe Aphodiini, which comprises about 170 genera and more than 2000 species worldwide. From Germany, more than 60 species of the genus have been recorded. A. obliteratus is known to occur in Western, Central and Southern Europe and prefers forests. It can be distinguished from its similar sister species A. contaminatus by the missing long setae at the lateral margins of the pronotum. The beetles appear already early in spring, from February to April, and again in September and October. The development takes place in all kinds of dung, preferably of large herbivores. In Germany, the species is of more western distribution and is not too common. Aphodius obliterates is regarded as vulnerable (RL 3). (CB)

11.06.2021
Acalles aubei Boh., 1837
Acalles aubei
 A
 B
 C
22 
The 3.5 to 5.5 mm large Acalles aubei (family Curculionidae) is among the larger representatives of the 14 species of the genus in Germany. Worldwide, the speciose subfamily Cryptorhynchinae comprises about 6000 species. The stenotopic, silvicolous species is known to occur from the Pyrenees and southern Central Europe to the Caucasus. The beetles can be found from May to October in deciduous and mixed forests, especially beech forests, where the live on dead branches of beech (Fagus) and chestnut (Castanea), occasionally on young firs (Abies). The can be found by using a beating tray or be sieving leaf litter. In Germany, recent records are only known from the Southwest (Baden, Palatinate and Saarland), but altogether scattered and rare. Acalles aubei is therefore regarded as endangered (RL 2). (CB)

04.06.2021
Xylotrechus rusticus (L., 1758)
Xylotrechus rusticus
 A
 B
 C
23 
The 9 to 20 mm large aspen zebra beetle Xylotrechus rusticus (family Cerambycidae) is among the relatively more common five representatives of the genus in Germany. The species is of palearctic distribution and ranges from Europe over Central Asia and Siberia to Korea and Japan. The stenotopic, silvicolous and xylodetricolous species lives in deciduous forests and at the edges of forests, in the Upper Rhine valley mainly in floodplain forests. The diurnal beetles can be found from End of May to July on dying or cut deciduous trees, e.g. willow, aspen, beech, birch and poplar, where their coloration provides excellent camouflage. The larval development takes up to three years in the wood of the above mentioned trees. In Germany, the species is missing in the Northwest. It is regarded as rare and endangered (RL 2). (CB)

28.05.2021
Lygistopterus sanguineus (L., 1758)
Lygistopterus sanguineus
 A
 B
 C
25 
The 6 to 12 mm large Lygistopterus sanguineus belongs to the seven species of the net-winged beetles (family Lycidae) in Germany and is the only representative of the genus in our fauna. Worldwide, the genus comprises 39 species, the majority of them in the Nearctic and Neotropic. Lygistopterus sanguineus is distinguished from all other Lycidae species in the European fauna by a snout protruding from the head. The eurytopic, silvicolous species is known to occur from Europe over Asia Minor to Eastern Siberia. In Germany recent records have been reported from virtually all Federal States and the species is not endangered. It can be found at the edges of forests on flowering herbs and shrubs as well as on decaying wood, especially oak and birch. The larvae are carnivorous, whereas the adult beetles feed on pollen. (CB)

21.05.2021
Microhoria nectarina (Panz., 1797)
Microhoria nectarina
 A
 B
 C
24 
The 3.8 to 4.5 mm large antlike flower beetle Microhoria nectarina (family Anthicidae) is one of two representatives of the genus present in Germany. With 90 representatives the genus is more speciose in Southern Europe. Formerly the species were counted into genus Anthicus. Microhoria nectarina is known to occur from the southern part of Central Europe to South Siberia and Central Asia. In Germany recent record have been reported from the Palatinate and Saxony-Anhalt only. M. nectarina is regarded as critically endangered (RL 1). The halotolerant species can be found at the edges of saline lakes, on heathland, in vineyards and sunny banks. Its occurrences are localized and scattered, but often with a large number of individuals. M. nectarina lives in decaying plant matter, in the low vegetation and on flowering plants. (CB)

14.05.2021
Chlaenius nitidulus (Schrk., 1781)
Chlaenius nitidulus
 A
 B
 C
24 
The 10 to 13 mm large vivid metallic ground beetle Chlaenius nitidulus (family Carabidae) is among the more common representatives of the ten species of the genus in Germany. Worldwide 860 species from 58 subgenera have been described from the Palearctic, Nearctic and Afrotropical region. Chlaenius nitidulus is known to occur in East, Central and South Europe as well as on the British Isles. The eurytopic, hygrophilous species prefers sun-exposed, loamy watersides in floodplains and clay pits and can be found on humid calcareous soil as well. Their lifestyle is predaceous, similar to many other ground beetles. Chlaenius nitidulus is mainly crepuscular and nocturnal and hides underneath stones in wet places during the day. In Germany the species is known from most Federal States and is regarded as vulnerable (RL 3). (CB)

07.05.2021
Platambus maculatus (L., 1758)
Platambus maculatus
 A
 B
 C
17 
The 7 to 8.5 mm large diving beetle Platambus maculatus (family Dytiscidae) is the only representative of the genus Platambus in Germany, which is quite speciose in the Palearctic and to a lesser extent in the Nearctic. The stenotopic species ranges from Europe to the Caucasus and Western Siberia. It is rheophilous and lives in the stagnant water zone of slowly flowing rivers and creeks with rich vegetation as well as in the surf-zone of lakes. Often the gregarious beetles can be found at the lower side of driftwood and on the water vegetation. Beetles and larvae prey on other water insects. When disturbed they exude a defense secretion, which contains the sesquiterpene Platambin as main component (Schildknecht, 1975). In Germany, Platambus maculatus is recorded from all Federal States and is not endangered. (CB)

30.04.2021
Onthophilus striatus (Forst., 1771)
Onthophilus striatus
 A
 B
 C
17 
The 2 to 2.5 mm large clown beetle Onthophilus striatus (family Histeridae) is one of four representatives of the genus in Europe. The holarctic genus comprises approx. 40 species, thereof two recorded from Germany. Some species in the genus live in the burrows of small mammals, others are phytodetricolous. Onthophilus striatus is known to occur in Southern, Western and Central Europe including the British Isles. The eurytopic, phytodetricolous species lives on grassland, in gardens and river meadows and at the edges of forests. The beetles can be found in decaying plant matter (also mushrooms), in compost, in dung heaps and straw, as well as in dung, carrion and bird nests. In Germany the species is widespread, but recent records are missing from the eastern Federal States. Onthophilus striatus is not endangered. (CB)


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9


 Map sheet: -
Close
Close
Close
Close
ModuleClose
up