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Text © K. Reißmann, T. Hörren, M. Stern, F. Bötzl and C. Benisch

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18.09.2020
Ceutorhynchus scapularis Gyll., 1837
Ceutorhynchus scapularis
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The 2.1 to 2.7 mm large weevil Ceutorhynchus scapularis (family Curculionidae) is one of the approx. 60 representatives of the genus in Germany. The conspicuous squamation of the pronotum allows a relatively easy determination of the species in the otherwise often difficult genus. C. scapularis occurs in Scandinavia, Central and Eastern Europe to Siberia. The stenotopic, ripicolous species lives on sandy edges of lakes and riverbanks and drying-up cut-off meanders. It develops oligophagous on Greater Yellowcress (Rorippa amphibian) and occasionally on Bog Yellowcress (R. palustris). The beetles can be found near their host plants from April on, but don't climb up the plants and can be found only by systematic search. Known from most Federal States in Germany but rare and regarded as near threatened (RL V). (CB)

11.09.2020
Pachybrachis picus Weise, 1882
Pachybrachis picus
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The 3 to 3.8 mm large Scriptured Leaf Beetle Pachybrachis (family Chrysomelidae) belongs to the species-rich genus Pachybrachis, which can be subdivided in the subgenera Pachybrachis s. str. and Chloropachys. The genus Pachybrachys s. str. comprises around 200 species in the Nearctic and 150 in the Palearctic, thereof 51 in Europe and 7 in Germany. Pachybrachis picus occurs in southern Central Europe, from North Spain over Central France and South Germany to Hungary and Central Italy. It prefers warm slopes, sun-exposed edges of forests and sunny river meadows. The stenotopic, thermophilous species develops on hazel (Corylus) and shrubs of the rose family (Rosaceae). In Germany, P. picus is missing in the northern half and is regarded as vulnerable (RL 3). The determination of the species is often not easy. (CB)

04.09.2020
Deleaster dichrous (Grav., 1802)
Deleaster dichrous
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The 6.5 to 8.5 large rove beetle Deleaster dichrous (family Staphylinidae) is the only representative of the genus Deleaster in Germany. Contrary to many other rove beetles, the stenotopic, ripicolous species is easily recognized by the habitus and its conspicuous coloration with black head and abdomen, red pronotum and orange elytra. It is widespread in the western Palearctic and has been introduced to the northeast coast of North America. Deleaster dichrous lives on sandy riverbanks and lakeshores, mainly on the wet sand, under stones and rubble, in detritus and occasionally on the lower vegetation. The nocturnal animals swarm during dusk and are regularly attracted to light. In Germany, recent records are known from virtually all Federal States and Deleaster dichrous is regarded as not endangered. (CB)

28.08.2020
Rhizotrogus marginipes Muls., 1842
Rhizotrogus marginipes
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17 
The 14 to 18 mm large scarab beetle Rhizotrogus marginipes (family Scarabaeidae) is one of four representatives of the genus Rhizotrogus in Germany. It belongs to the subfamily Melolonthinae and is closely related with the European cockchafers (Melolontha) and European june beetles (Amphimallon), from which it can be distinguished by the 10-membered antenna and the marginate base of the pronotum. It occurs from Southwest to the southwestern part of Central Europe and prefers dry slopes on calcareous ground. The males swarm during dusk, while the females sit in the lower vegetation. Larval development takes two years on plant roots in the ground. In Germany, there are only records from the south half and Rhizotrogus marginipes is regarded similar to other representatives of the genus as critically endangered (RL 1). (CB)

21.08.2020
Trogoderma versicolor (Creutz., 1799)
Trogoderma versicolor
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The 2 to 5 mm European larger cabinet beetle Trogoderma versicolor (family Dermestidae) is one of six representatives of the genus in Germany. The stenotopic species occurs throughout nearly the entire Palearctic, from North Africa over Europe to North Asia, however scattered and rare in Central Europe. Little is known about the biology of Trogoderma versicolor. The adults are usually found between May and August on blossoms and at tree sap, mostly in areas with favorable warm microclimate. The larvae are entomo-necrophagous and develop in the nests of hymenopterans or synanthropic as pests in insect collections in museums. In Germany, recent records are known from Baden, the Palatinate, Northrhine and from Brandenburg. Although Trogoderma versicolor is only occasionally recorded, it is not regarded as endangered in Germany. (CB)

14.08.2020
Curimopsis setigera (Ill., 1798)
Curimopsis setigera
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The 2.2 to 2.7 mm large pill beetle Curimopsis setigera (family Byrrhidae) is the most common of the six representatives of the genus in Germany. The genus is of holarctic distribution and comprises 20 species. They are usually found alongside rivers on sandy-loamy ground; some species live in the montane to high alpine zone in moss cushions. Curimopsis setigera is widespread in Central Europe. The stenotopic, psammophilous and muscophagous species lives on sandy and loamy river banks, sand and gravel pits and in brickworks. Die animals graze on fine mosses and algal mats. Their squamation serves as an excellent camouflage on their substrate. In Germany, recent records are known from all Federal States, and the species is not regarded as endangered, but is nevertheless only occasionally found. Determination is difficult in most cases. (CB)

07.08.2020
Scydmaenus perrisii Rtt., 1881
Scydmaenus perrisii
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The only 1.6 to 1.9 mm large ant-like stone beetle Scydmaenus perrisii (family Scydmaenidae) is one of four representatives of the genus in Germany. The family comprises approx. 4500 species worldwide. Due to their small size they attract little attention and are of no economic significance. The male of Scydmaenus perrisii can be easily recognized by its impressed, flattened vertex. The stenotopic, silvicolous and myrmecophilous species prefers wet forests, river meadows and parks as habitat. They live in decaying wood, trunks and hollow trees with ants of genus Lasius. They prey on mites. Scydmaenus perrisii is known to occur in Southern Europe and the southern part of Central Europe. In Germany, recent records are known from a number of Federal States. However, discoveries are rare and the species is regarded as endangered (RL 2). (CB)

31.07.2020
Nebria livida (L., 1758)
Nebria livida
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The 12 to 16 mm large ground beetle Nebria livida (family Carabidae) is one of eleven representatives of the genus Nebria in Germany. It is known to occur from North, Middle and Eastern Europe to Siberia and Japan. With its conspicuous yellow pronotum, the black, yellow-margined elytra and the likewise yellow legs and antenna the species is unmistakable in our fauna. The eurytopic, hygrophilous and ripicolous species can be found at the edges of rivers and lakes as well as coasts with wet, clayey cliffs under stones and detritus. In the Upper Rhine valley also land tongues at quarry ponds reaching far into the water are colonized. In Germany, recent records for Nebria livida are known form virtually all Federal States, but the species is everywhere rare or very rare and is regarded as vulnerable (RL 3). (CB)

24.07.2020
Dryophthorus corticalis (Payk., 1792)
Dryophthorus corticalis
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The 3 to 4 mm large saproxylic wood-boring weevil Dryophthorus corticalis (family Curculionidae) is the only representative of the genus in Europe. Worldwide around 50 species have been described, most of them from the pacific islands from Hawaii to New Zealand, where they disseminate with driftwood. The thermophilic species occurs in forests of the lowlands. They develop in red-rot of fallen and standing deciduous or coniferous trees, e.g. oak (Quercus), pine (Pinus) and spruce (Picea). The species is rare and scattered in Germany. Whereas from the Northwest mainly old records are known, it is more regularly found in the upper Rhine valley and the Neckar basin. Dryophthorus corticalis is regarded as vulnerable (RL 3) (Bense, 2002). Rheinheimer/Hassler (2010) propose near threatened (RL V) as new classification. (CB)

17.07.2020
Mesosa nebulosa (F., 1781)
Mesosa nebulosa
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The 9 to 15 mm large White-clouded longhorn beetle Mesosa nebulosa (family Cerambycidae) is the more common of the two Mesosa species in Germany. Its coloration is a camouflage perfectly adapted to a life on bark. The beetle occurs in North Africa and Europe and is neither rare nor common. It is polyphagous and develops in a 2-3-year cycle in dead branches of various deciduous trees, e.g. common hornbeam (Carpinus), beech (Fagus), oak (Quercus), maple (Acer), elm (Ulmus) and lime (Tilia). The beetles hatch in autumn and hibernate in the puparium. The eurytopic, silvicolous beetles can be found from April to June on bushes, trees and stacks of wood in deciduous forests and at edges of forests. In Germany there are recent records from all Federal States. Nevertheless, M. nebulosa is regarded as vulnerable (RL 3). (CB)

10.07.2020
Galeruca interrupta Ill., 1802
Galeruca interrupta
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The 6 to 9 mm large leaf beetle Galeruca interrupta (family Chrysomelidae) is one of six representatives of the genus in Germany. It can be distinguished from the sister species by the strongly and intermittently ribbed elytra as well as the flat front angles of the pronotum. The stenotopic, xerophilic species prefers heathland, sandy areas in fens and dry, sandy fallow land. Several subspecies have been described: The monophagous ssp. interrupta develops on field wormwood (Artemisia campestris), the oligophagous ssp. circumdata on Tall Pepperwort (Lepidium graminifolium) and Hoary Cress (Lepidium draba). Galeruca interrupta is of Western Palearctic distribution, from Spain to Central Asia. In Germany, no recent records are known from a number of Federal States and the species is regarded as endangered (RL 2). (CB)

03.07.2020
Phosphaenus hemipterus (Goeze, 1777)
Phosphaenus hemipterus
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The 6 to 10 mm large European lesser glow worm Phosphaenus hemipterus (family Lampyridae) is the only representative of the genus in Germany. Similar to many species of the family, they are able to produce cold light through bioluminescence, however weaker than its two native sister species. The female is wingless, the male has shortened wings. Contrary to all other 2000 species of Lampyridae, both male and female are flightless. Presumably, the female uses pheromones to attract the male. The larva is up to 10 mm long and feeds on worms. They can be found on pastures, river meadows and at the edges of forests, but also in gardens and parks. The species occurs from the Mediterranean region to the southern part of Northern Europe. It has been in introduced to North America. In Germany, it is regarded as vulnerable (RL 3). (CB)

26.06.2020
Silis ruficollis (F., 1775)
Silis ruficollis
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The 6 to 7.5 mm large soldier beetle Silis ruficollis (family Cantharidae) is the more common of the two representatives of the genus in Germany. The male with its red, deeply notched and coarsely punctate pronotum is easily recognized. The pronotum of the rarer sister species Silis Nitidula exhibits rounded hind angles. Silis ruficollis is widespread in Europe and prefers habitats in the lowlands, especially wet areas, fens and reedbeds. The beetles can be found on reed, willows and blossoms from late June to July, occasionally until August. In Germany, Silis ruficollis has been recorded from virtually all Federal States, but is rarely observed. Only in the North and East German plain it is slightly more common. Silis ruficollis is not regarded as endangered and is not listed in the Red List of endangered species of Germany. (CB)

19.06.2020
Ptinus rufipes Ol., 1790
Ptinus rufipes
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The 3 to 5 mm large spider beetle Ptinus rufipes (family Ptinidae) is one of 16 representatives of the genus currently known to occur in Germany. The species ranges from virtually entire Europe to northern Russia and the Caucasus. The development takes place in wood of deciduous trees, e.g. oak (Quercus), beech (Fagus), hornbeam (Carpinus), linden (Tilia), elm (Ulmus) and hazel (Corylus) infested with white rot. Contrary to other representatives of the genus, the larva does not only feed on the leftovers of other insects, but on the wood itself. Like many Ptinidae, Ptinus rufipes exhibits a marked sexual dimorphism: The elytra of the female are rounded oval and covered with scales, whereas the male is elongate and without scales. In Germany, Ptinus rufipes is the most common Ptinus species and present in all Federal States. (CB)

12.06.2020
Xestobium rufovillosum (DeGeer, 1774)
Xestobium rufovillosum
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The 5 to 9 mm large Death watch beetle Xestobium rufovillosum (family Anobiidae) is the largest representative of the family in Germany. During the mating season the male creates a ticking sound by knocking its head against wood to attract potential mates. In quiet rooms, such as sickrooms or formerly during the death watch, the ticking sound can be perceived by humans, earning the beetle its vernacular name. The development cycle takes 2-3 years in deciduous or coniferous wood, which exhibits a certain level of humidity and is infested with fungi. Hence, X. rufovillosum can be regarded as secondary pest. Initially occurring in Europe, the species has been introduced to North America and Australia. In Germany, recent records are known from all Federal States and Xestobium rufovillosum is not endangered. (CB)

05.06.2020
Lixus bardanae (F., 1787)
Lixus bardanae
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The 8 to 12 mm large weevil Lixus bardanae (family Curculionidae) is one of 15 representatives of the genus in Germany. In Europe more than 70 species are known. Its distribution ranges from Spain to Asia Minor and the Caucasus. L. bardanae lives on bunches of Western Dock (Rumex aquaticus) and Great Water Dock (R. hydrolapathum) standing in the water. Therefore it is best observed from aboard a boat. The larvae develop in the stems of the Dock, where they also pupate. Young specimens owe their attractive appearance to the covering with fine yellow dust, which wears off quickly in collected specimens. In Germany, the stenotopic, paludicolous species is nowhere really common, although it is less rare in the northern part. Lixus bardanae is regarded as vulnerable (RL 3) (text/photos: Michael Stern). (MS)

29.05.2020
Lyctus cavicollis Lec., 1805
Lyctus cavicollis
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The 2.5 to 5 mm large Western Powder-post Beetle Lyctus cavicollis (family Lyctidae) is one of seven representatives of the genus in Germany. Worldwide around 100 species have been described. Two of them are native in Germany and another five have been introduced, among them L. cavicollis, which is meanwhile established in the wild. The species' origin is North America. In 1974 it was introduced for the first time, since the mid 1990's it is established in our fauna. The larvae develop in dry wood of deciduous trees, which they digest with the support of symbiotic microorganisms. Before egg deposition, the female samples the wood by gnawing small marks on the surface. The wood surface is not visibly impaired and an infestation is often only recognized at later stages from the exit holes of the beetles. (CB)

22.05.2020
Xylographus bostrychoides (Duf., 1843)
Xylographus bostrychoides
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The 2 to 2.4 mm large minute tree-fungus beetle Xylographus bostrychoides (family Cisidae) is the only representative of the genus in Germany and Europe. The species occurs in the south palearctic ecozone, from North Africa over South Europe and southern Central Europe to the Caucasus and Siberia. In Germany the species was first recorded in 1998. The stenotopic, mycetobiont beetle develops in various bracket fungi, e.g. Tinder Fungus (Fomes fomentarium), Artists Bracket (Ganoderma applanatum) and Southern Bracket (Ganoderma adspersum). So far only recorded from the Upper Rhine valley, further spreading of the species is likely, as the host fungi are widespread and common. Being new to the German beetle fauna, Xylographus bostrychoides is not part of the Red List of endangered species of Germany. (CB)

15.05.2020
Polystichus connexus (Fourcr., 1785)
Polystichus connexus
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In Germany, the 7 to 9 mm large ground beetle Polystichus connexus (family Carabidae) is the only representative of the genus, which is mainly distributed in Eurasia and America. In Europe, another similar and closely related species, P. fasciolatus, is present. P. connexus ranges from North Africa over Southern Europe and southern Central Europe to West Asia and Siberia. The eurytopic and thermophilic species prefers dry to humid grassland, pasture and floodplains. Little is known about its lifestyle, as most discoveries are made either in flood detritus or at light traps. In Germany, the species has been recorded from the Palatinate, Baden-Württemberg and Bavaria, and more recently from Saxony and Saxony-Anhalt. In our fauna, P. connexus is regarded as extremely rare and/or geographically restricted (RL R). (CB)

08.05.2020
Exapion formaneki (Wagn., 1929)
Exapion formaneki
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The 1.8 to 2.3 mm large apionid weevil Exapion formaneki (family Apionidae) is one of seven representatives of the genus in Germany. The oligophagous species lives on various species of broom (Genista, Cytisus). Depending on the growth stage of the host plant, E. formaneki changes its host plant during the year. The larval development takes place in the fruit pods of the host plant, where the larva also pupates. The new beetle generation hatches between July and September and hibernates in the ground. The stenotopic, xerophilic species prefers warm and dry slopes, warm edges of forests and clearings. It is known to occur in Central, Eastern and Southeastern Europe. In Germany there are records from most Federal States, except from the northwest. E. formaneki is regarded as vulnerable (RL 3). (CB)

01.05.2020
Rhaphitropis oxyacanthae (Bris., 1863)
Rhaphitropis oxyacanthae
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The 2.5 to 3 mm large fungus weevil Rhaphitropis oxyacanthae (family Anthribidae) is the less common of the two representatives of the genus in Germany. The males are distinguished by a conspicuous, flattened tooth on the middle femora. The stenotopic, silvicolous species lives only in very warm habitats and develops in dead branches of deciduous trees, mainly oak (Quercus), but also hazel (Corylus), alder (Alnus), willow (Salix) and beech (Fagus). It is known to occur in Southwest Europe and in the southern part of Central Europe, from the Pyrenees to Poland and Slovakia. In Germany, the only records come from the arid floodplain in the Markgräflerland and from the Kaiserstuhl in South Baden, where the species reaches the northern border of its range. R. oxyacanthae is regarded as endangered (RL 2). (CB)

24.04.2020
Oprohinus suturalis (F., 1775)
Oprohinus suturalis
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The 2.5 to 3.3 mm large onion weevil Oprohinus suturalis (family Curculionidae) is one of two representatives of the genus in Germany. In Europe, the genus comprises four species. The distribution of O. suturalis ranges from North Africa over Europe to Western Asia. The stenotopic, xerophilic species prefers dry lynchets, ruderal sites, gardens and calcareous grassland as habitat. The phyllophagous beetles are oligophagous and develop on onion species (Allium). They can become a pest in cultures of onion (A. cepa) and garlic (A. sativum). The beetles appear in May and feed on the foliage of the hosts. The larvae hatch in June. After 5-6 weeks of feeding on the foliage they pupate in the ground. The new generation appears in August and hibernates. In Germany the species is not endangered. (CB)

17.04.2020
Cryptocephalus coryli (L., 1758)
Cryptocephalus coryli
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The 6 to 7 mm large Hazel pot beetle Cryptocephalus coryli (family Chrysomelidae) belongs to the larger representatives of the approx. 50 species of the genus in Germany. Its distribution ranges from Spain over Central Europe and Russia to Siberia till Korea. The stenotopic, thermophilic species prefers warm slopes and sun-exposed edges of forests. It develops mainly in hazel (Corylus) and birch (Betula). After egg deposition, the females cover the eggs with their own dung and drop them into the leaf litter underneath the bush. After hatching, the larvae continue to add to the pot from their own droppings. When threatened, the larvae retreat into the pot and also hibernate in the pot. In Germany, Cryptocephalus coryli is recorded from most Federal States, but is regarded as vulnerable (RL 3). (CB)

10.04.2020
Menesia bipunctata (Zoubk., 1829)
Menesia bipunctata
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The 6 to 9 mm large longhorn beetle Menesia bipunctata (family Cerambycidae) is the only representative of the genus in Germany. Its distribution ranges from West France over Russia to the South Ural Mountains and in South Europe from Northeast Italy over Slovenia to Romania. The stenotopic, paludicolous species prefers bogs, fens and wet floodplain forests as habitat. The larvae develop in dead, thin branches of Alder Buckthorn (Frangula alnus), only occasionally in other deciduous trees. The adults sit on the lower side of the leaves and escape swiftly in warm sunny weather. In Germany, recent records are known from a number of Federal States with an extinction zone in the Rhineland, Northrhine-Westphalia, Hesse and Thuringia. The species is regarded as vulnerable (RL 3). (CB)

03.04.2020
Aphodius satellitius (Hbst., 1789)
Aphodius satellitius
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The 6 to 8 mm large dung beetle Aphodius satellitius (family Scarabaeidae) is one of approximately 60 currently recorded species of the genus Aphodius in Germany. Aphodius satellitius is known to occur in Central and South Europe, North Africa and in to East to the Ural Mountains. Until its rediscovery in the forest Bienwald a few years ago, A. satellitius was deemed extinct in Germany (RL 0). The stenotopic, xerothermophilic species prefers sunny pastures and warm slopes. It develops in dung of cow and horse. It can be distinguished from other, similar species of the genus by its rounded cheeks, the shiny head and pronotum and the auburn elytra with a diffuse black mark at the beginning of the last third. Any records in Germany should be inspected and confirmed by experts. (CB)


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