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Text © K. Reißmann, T. Hörren, M. Stern, F. Bötzl and C. Benisch

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14.06.2019
Drapetes cinctus (Panz., 1796)
Drapetes cinctus
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The 4 to 5 mm large Drapetes cinctus (family Lissomidae) is the only representative of the family in Germany, closely related to the families Elateridae and Throscidae. The distribution ranges from Southern Europe to the southeastern part of North Europe. It avoids regions with Atlantic climate. In the south and the east it is known to occur in the Caucasus, Asia Minor and Syria. The stenotopic, mycetophilous Drapetes cinctus develops in decaying wood of deciduous trees, e.g. in beech (Fagus), birch (Betula) and oak (Quercus). On warm days, the adult beetles can be found on decaying wood and occasionally on blossoms. They escape swiftly. In Germany, the species is found only sporadically and is regarded as rare. In the Red List of endangered species Drapetes cinctus is classified as vulnerable (RL 3). (CB)

07.06.2019
Buprestis rustica L., 1758
Buprestis rustica
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With a body length of 12 to 20 mm, the Eurosiberian Jewel beetle Buprestis rustica is among the large representatives of the Jewel beetles (family Buprestidae) in Germany. The development cycle takes two to three years and takes place mainly in spruce (Picea) and fir (Abies), but also in other conifers. In Germany, Buprestis rustica prefers montane to subalpine coniferous forests at altitudes between 800 and 1000 m ASL, therefore the distribute range in Germany is limited. The species has disappeared from Westphalia and Mecklenburg-Pomerania. In Southwest Germany it is less common than in the East German occurrences. Within its distribution range Buprestis rustica is not rare, therefore the species is not included in the German Red list of endangered species. (KR/CB)

31.05.2019
Nacerdes carniolica (Gistl., 1832)
Nacerdes carniolica
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The 12 to 15 mm large false blister beetle Nacerdes carniolica (family Oedemeridae) is one of only two species of the genus in Germany. In former times it was comprised in the genus Xanthochroa. The distribution of N. carniolica ranges from Southern to Eastern Europe. In Germany only the southern half is reached, however, the species is meanwhile much more common than 50 years ago. The stenotopic, silvicolous species lives in pine and mixed forests and develops in rotten trunks of pine and spruce. The adult beetles appear from June to August and are nocturnal. They can be found on strong-smelling blossoms, e.g. linden (Tilia), buckeye (Aesculus) and rose (Rosa). The animals contain a poison, causing blisters when brought in contact with human skin. In Germany, N. carniolica is regarded as vulnerable (RL 3). (CB)

24.05.2019
Chlorophorus figuratus (Scop., 1763)
Chlorophorus figuratus
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The 7 to 13 mm large longhorn beetle Chlorophorus figuratus (family Cerambycidae) is one of four representatives of the genus in Germany, all of them are rather rare. The black elytra exhibit three white bands and white spots on the shoulders – similar only to C. sartor in Germany. C. figuratus is of south palearctic distribution, from Southern to Central Europe, Asia Minor, the Caucasus to Western Siberia. The stenotopic, thermophilic species lives on warm slopes and heath steppe and develops xylophagous in dead branches of elm (Ulmus), oak (Quercus), chestnut (Castanea) and others deciduous trees in a 2-year development cycle. The adults visit blossoms, they can be found from June to August on Compositae, Umbelliferae and hawthorn. In Germany the species is regarded as endangered (RL 2). (CB)

17.05.2019
Chrysolina staphylaea (L., 1758)
Chrysolina staphylaea
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The 6 to 9 mm large Brown Mint Leaf Beetle Chysolina staphylaea (family Chrysomelidae) is one of 30 species of the genus currently known to occur in Germany. The distribution ranges from Western Europe (except Spain) into the east (Asia). In the late 19th century the beetle was also introduced into North America and is established in Canada today. The eurytopic, halotolerant species lives on marshy meadows alongside creeks and at the edges of wet forests. Chrysolina staphylaea is oligophagous and develops on mint (Mentha) and plaintains (Plantago), occasionally on Melissa and basil (Ocimum). They can be found already early in spring in hay and plant detritus. The species is known to occur throughout Germany and is not regarded as endangered. (CB)

10.05.2019
Malvapion malvae (F., 1775)
Malvapion malvae
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The mallow weevil Malvapion malvae is one of the few representatives of the family Apionidae, which can be easily determined by photograph. Head and pronotum are black colored, the elytra are light brown with black shoulders and a black triangular spot around the scutellum, which can be prolonged along the elytral suture towards the apex of the elytra. The pubescence of the elytra is relatively dense, but does not obscure the color of the elytra completely and makes the species unmistakable. The 1.8 to 2.4 mm large beetles and their larvae live on mallow (Malvaceae). The larvae develop in the ovary. Malvapion malvae occurs in the whole palearctic region with the exception of Northern Europe. In Germany the species is not regarded as endangered. (KR)

03.05.2019
Trichocellus placidus (Gyll., 1827)
Trichocellus placidus
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The 4.2 to 5 mm large ground beetle Trichocellus placidus (family Carabidae) is one of two representatives of the family in Germany. The distribution range of the Eurosiberian species stretches from France to Western Siberia and from Fennoscandia to Hungary. The eurytopic, hygrophilous species lives on the marshy edges of meso- to eutrophic waters, on marshy meadows and in wet deciduous forests. T. placidus can ascend to the montane region up to 1000 m above sea level. It is usually found in hassocks, in moss and in vegetable detritus. The species is known throughout Germany and is not regarded as endangered. The sister species, T. cognatus, shows a more boreal distribution and can be distinguished by its pronotum, which is more contracted towards the basis in T. placidus. (CB)

26.04.2019
Cantharis pagana Rosh., 1847
Cantharis pagana
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The 6 to 8.5 mm large soldier beetle Cantharis pagana (family Cantharidae) is one of 24 representatives of the family in Germany, which are at least partly not easily determined. Its distribution range stretches from Spain over Central Europe to Romania and Greece. The montane, stenotopic species lives in the Alps and in the low mountain range. In Germany there are no records from the northern Federal States. In the mountains, it reaches the tree line and can be found at the edges of forest on trees (e.g. pine and spruce) and bushes (e.g. hawthorn). In Germany Cantharis pagana is not endangered. The coloration is pretty variable, which lead to the description as C. fibulata and C. albomarginata. The latter are today considered to be synonyms to Cantharis pagana. (CB)

19.04.2019
Dermestes frischii Kug., 1792
Dermestes frischii
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The larder beetle Dermestes frischii (family Dermestidae) is one of 17 representatives of the genus Dermestes in Germany. Both beetles and larvae are occasionally found on ham, bacon and other animal products, like dried fish, hides and horn and can cause damage to stored products, which is also the origin of their vernacular name. In the wild they feed on old, sundried carcasses and carrion, dry remnants of meat, but also hair and feathers, as dermestids are able to digest keratin. The distribution of Dermestes frischii ranges from the tropical regions of America and Africa to the whole holarctic region. In Germany, the species is one of the most common dermestids and is known to occur in all Federal States. (KR/CB)

12.04.2019
Triphyllus bicolor (F., 1792)
Triphyllus bicolor
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The 3.5 to 4 mm large hairy fungus beetle Triphyllus bicolor (family Mycetophagidae) is known to occur in Central and Southern Europe as well as in the southern regions of Northern Europe. In the east, its range reaches Western Russia. In Germany, Triphyllus bicolor is recorded from all Federal States, however, it is generally regarded as rare. The stenotopic, silvicolous species is mycetobiont and develops on soft fleshed agarics on decaying wood of deciduous trees, especially oak (Quercus) and beech (Fagus). There seems to be a preference for the beefsteak fungus (Fistulina hepatica). Both beetles and larvae feed on fungal hyphae and spores. For pupation, the larvae dig themselves into the ground. In the Red List of Germany Triphyllus bicolor is classified as vulnerable (RL 3). (CB)

05.04.2019
Curtimorda maculosa (Naez., 1794)
Curtimorda maculosa
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The tumbling flower beetle Curtimorda maculosa (family Mordellidae) is one of only two representatives of the genus in Germany, which can be distinguished by the silvery spots on the otherwise black elytra. Curtimorda maculosa shows a boreomontane distribution with occurrences in Fennoscandia, the low mountain range in Germany and France and in the Alps. The stenotopic species lives on openings in mixed forests, on clear cuttings and glades. It develops on stumps and decaying logs of spruce (Picea) on the fungus Trichaptum abietinum. In Germany there are records from a number of Federal States, however, the species is discovered only sporadically. In the Red List of endangered species in Germany, Curtimorda maculosa is regarded as vulnerable (RL 3). (CB)

29.03.2019
Callimus angulatus (Schrk., 1789)
Callimus angulatus
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The 7 to 9 mm large longhorn beetle Callimus angulatus (family Cerambycidae) is the only representative of the genus in Germany. The distribution of the Mediterranean species ranges from Spain over Italy to the Caucasus and North Iran and reaches the south of Central Europe in the circumalpine region. In Germany the thermophilic species is restricted to the southern half and is very rare. The larva develops in dead branches as thick as an arm of oak (Quercus) and beech (Fagus). The slender, metallic blue beetles can be found on sunny days on sunny slopes and on the edges of forests on hawthorn (Crataegus) and buckthorn (Rhamnus), very rarely on other flowers (composites). In Germany Callimus angulatus is regarded as endangered (RL 2). (CB)

22.03.2019
Gonioctena fornicata Brüggemann, 1873
Gonioctena fornicata
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The Lucerne beetle Gonioctena fornicata (family Chrysomelidae) has been recorded for the German fauna for the first time in 2003. Gonioctena fornicata is one of twelve representatives of the genus in Germany, which are very similar to each other. Originally, the species is an element of the pontic fauna with xerothermic habitat requirements. Probably the species has been introduced to Baden-Württemberg with ship transports on river Rhine and its tributaries and is meanwhile established in the Upper Rhine valley. Adults and larvae of the 5 to 7 mm large species live on Lucerne (alfalfa, Medicago) and clover (Trifolium) and are classified as pests. In the US the species has been introduced several times with transports and is regarded as quarantine pest. (KR/CB)

15.03.2019
Sibinia phalerata (Gyll., 1836)
Sibinia phalerata
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The 2 to 2.4 mm small weevil Sibinia phalerata (family Curculionidae) is one of more than 200 species in the genus worldwide. In Germany 12 species are known to occur. The stenotopic, xerothermophilic species lives in dry and sun-exposed habitats on nutrient-poor sward, e.g. open sand dunes and gravel surfaces. Like most of the European species Sibinia phalerata develops on herbaceous plants of the pink family (Caryophyllaceae), e.g. Arenaria, Cerastium, Dianthus and Silene. The distribution ranges from Europe (without the far north) to Central Asia. In Germany the species has been recorded from most Federal States (except the northwest), but is generally rare. In the Red List of endangered species Sibinia phalerata is classified as vulnerable (RL 3). (CB)

08.03.2019
Perigona nigriceps (Dej., 1831)
Perigona nigriceps
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The just 2.4 to 3.2 mm large ground beetle Perigona nigriceps (family Carabidae) is the only representative of the genus in Central Europe. The species originates from the Indian Ocean and has been introduced to North America and Europe in the early 19th century. Meanwhile it has become a cosmopolitan. It is known to occur throughout Germany, but is only sporadically recorded. The eurytopic, thermophilic species is predacious and inhabits gardens, ruderal sites, dumps and landfills. It lives in compost, decaying plant matter and heaps of wood chippings, from which the beetle can be collected by sieving. The beetles are rather poor flyers and are attracted to light sources. With their black head, the short, pearl string-shaped antennae and the brownish to yellow elytra with the deeply engraved 8th sutural stria the species is easily recognized. (CB)

01.03.2019
Trichodes alvearius (F., 1792)
Trichodes alvearius
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The 10 to 15 mm large Checkered beetle Trichodes alvearius (family Cleridae) is one of only two representatives of the genus in Germany. It can be distinguished from its sister species by the black elytral suture and the black apical elytral stripe, which does not reach the red apex of the elytra. The species is known to occur in Southern and Central Europe. The beetles are found on blossoms, where to prey on other insects, but also feed on pollen. The females lay their eggs in the nests of solitary bees. After hatching, the larva feeds first on the egg or the young larvae of the bees, later on their pollen reserve. In the Red List of endangered species of Germany, Trichodes alvearius is classified as vulnerable (RL 3). (KR/CB)

22.02.2019
Cytilus sericeus (Forst., 1771)
Cytilus sericeus
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The 4.5 to 5.5 mm large pill beetle Cytilus sericeus (family Byrrhidae) is the only representative of the genus in Germany. Contrary to other species of the family, Cytilus sericeus is only partly able to hide its antenna and legs in cavities on its lower side, a protection mechanism that is also the origin of the family's vernacular name. Cytilus sericeus is of rounded oval body shape, the elytra are checkered metallic green to bronze-brown and black. The beetle can be found on wet meadows, in floodplains, in peat bogs and fens on moss and sphagnum. Both adult beetles and larvae feed on moss. The distribution of Cytilus sericeus ranges from Europe far into the east. In Germany there are recent records from all Federal States. The species is regarded as not endangered. (CB)

15.02.2019
Mycetophagus quadriguttatus Müll., 1821
Mycetophagus quadriguttatus
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The 3.5 to 4 mm large Mycetophagus quadriguttatus (family Mycetophagidae) is one of ten representatives of the genus in Germany. Some of the species resemble each other quite a bit. However, they can be distinguished by their habitus, coloration and by the form of the club of the antenna. The latter is four-segmented and the last segment is barely longer than the second last in Mycetophagus quadriguttatus. The species occurs throughout the holarctic and lives in deciduous forests in mouldy detritus and brushwood of oak (Quercus), beech (Fagus) and on agarics as well as synanthropic in barns and stables in mouldy hay and straw and on moulding foodstuffs. Both adult beetles and larvae feed on mould fungi and their spores. In Germany, Mycetophagus quadriguttatus is currently recorded from all Federal States and is regarded as not endangered. (CB)

08.02.2019
Tetratoma ancora F., 1790
Tetratoma ancora
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The 3 to 3.5 mm large polypore fungus beetle Tetratoma ancora (family Tetratomidae) is one of three representatives of the genus in Germany. The species are characterized by their 4-membered club of the antenna, which is also reflected in the scientific name of the family. T. ancora can be easily distinguished from the sister species T. fungorum and T. desmaresti by the variable yellow markings on the elytra. The distribution ranges from Central Europe to the far north of Europe and Russia. The species develops on branches of deciduous trees, especially beech (Fagus), oak (Quercus), maple (Acer) which are infested by crust fungi (Corticium), occasionally bitter oyster (Panus stipticus) and turkey tail (Coriolus versicolor). In Germany, T. ancora is widespread, but rare (RL 3). (CB)

01.02.2019
Pedostrangalia revestita (L., 1767)
Pedostrangalia revestita
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The longhorn beetle Pedostrangalia revestita (family Cerambycidae) is known to occur in virtually all Federal States of Germany. However, due to its acrodendric lifestyle and the very special requirements of the larvae the beetle is rarely found. Some observations of animals fallen from the treetop are known, but mostly records result from specimen reared from larvae. The larvae develop in various deciduous trees, mainly in red rotted parts of living trees or in the insertion points of dead branches. The attractive species is 8 to 15 mm large and can be mixed up with Rhamnusium bicolor at first sight. However, the latter is considerably larger (15-23 mm) and has a completely different lifestyle. In Germany Pedostrangalia revestita is regarded as endangered (RL 2). (KR)

25.01.2019
Oreina cacaliae (Schrk., 1785)
Oreina cacaliae
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Together with other representatives of the genus Oreina the 7.5 to 10 mm large alpine leaf beetle Oreina cacaliae is among the large leaf beetles (family Chrysomelidae) in Central Europe. In Germany the genus is present in the Alps, a few species have also been recorded from the Black Forest and in the Bavarian Forest. Most of the species are of bright and shiny metallic and extraordinarily variable coloration, which makes their determination pretty difficult. Oreina cacaliae is known to occur in the mountain range of Bavaria and Baden-Württemberg as well as in Saxony. The beetles feed first on Alpine Butterbur (Petasites paradoxus) and later switch to Adenostyles alliariae, on which their larvae develop. (KR)

18.01.2019
Hypera arator (L., 1758)
Hypera arator
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The 4.5 to 6 mm large weevil Hypera arator (family Curculionidae) is one of 28 representatives of the genus in Germany. It can be distinguished from other Hypera species by its distinctive, elegant markings. The palearctic distribution range of Hypera arator spreads over North Africa, throughout Europe and till Siberia. The eurytopic, halotolerant species can be found on meadows, alongside brooks and in flood plains as well as on ruderal sites and salt marshes near dykes. They develop in various plants of the pink family (Caryophyllaceae), e.g. in pink (Dianthus), campion (Silene), catchfly (Lychnis), spurrey (Spergula), stitchwort (Stellaria) and others. In Germany the species known to occur in all Federal States and not regarded as endangered. (CB)

11.01.2019
Deronectes aubei (Muls., 1843)
Deronectes aubei
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Deronectes aubei is among the few representatives of the predaceous diving beetles (family Dytiscidae) living in running water. For their life in the hyporheic zone they exhibit specific morphological adaptions. The beetle can survive submerged for over six weeks (Kehl, Dettner, Journal of Morphology, 2009, 270 (11), 1348-1355). Their camouflage is remarkable: The beetles resemble both in size and color the bracts of leaf buds and are hardly distinguished from them in running water. Their mode of movement is atypical for a diving beetle: Deronectes aubei crawls slowly on the ground, leaps up, swims a short distance and settles again on the ground. Also the movement resembles a bract flowing in the running water. In Germany, it is restricted to a few brooks in the Black Forest and is classified as extremely rare (RL R) in the Red List. (KR/CB)

04.01.2019
Necrobia ruficollis (F., 1775)
Necrobia ruficollis
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The red-shouldered ham beetle Necrobia ruficollis (family Cleridae) is one of three representatives of the genus in Germany and can be easily distinguished by the red pronotum and the red shoulders of the elytra. In the wild, the beetles appear on old carcasses and on carrion in the later dry stages of decay, where the adults prey on the larvae of other insects, whereas the larvae of N. ruficollis feed on dry leftovers of the carcass. Presumably the origin of the species is not located in Europe, but it cannot be established unequivocally today, because the species has been distributed throughout the world with foodstuffs since centuries. In Germany there are recent records from all regions, however, discoveries are sporadic and rather rare, especially in the north. (KR)

28.12.2018
Stelidota geminata Say, 1825
Stelidota geminata
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The Strawberry Sap Beetle Stelidota geminata (family Nitidulidae) was discovered at the Kaiserstuhl by G. Krumm in 2007 for the first time in Germany. The invasive species originates from the subtropical zone of the Nearctic and has meanwhile spread to most regions of Southwest Germany. Similar to Epuraea ocularis, the beetle lives on rotting fruits and can be easily found in late summer and during autumn on windfall fruits, in which the larvae develop. Gender can be easily determined by their hind tibiae, which are curved and thickened towards the apex and furthermore by the thickened foot of the forelegs in the male. In the US the species is an economic pest in strawberry cultivation. Because over-ripe fruit is especially attractive, damage is often greatest in U-Pick operations where pickers leave large numbers of (over-) ripe berries in the field. (KR/CB)


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